Michigan Pool News

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Model Aquatic Health Code (CMAHC) 

We are excited to share that the Council for the Model Aquatic Health Code (CMAHC) is launching a new certification program to help inform the public about certain aquatic services and products that meet strict standards to protect people’s health and safety at public aquatic venues. As part of the program, the CMAHC will certify services or products that comply with the relevant or applicable standards and procedures outlined in the Model Aquatic Health Code (MAHC).

http://cmahc.org/cmahc-certification-program.php

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Congratulations! Operator of the year goes to Chris Rosenkranz of Great Lakes Athletic Club”

 
 

What other pool water tests can be done?

Biguanide water treatment systems use test kits, or you can use biguanide test strips to check sanitizer levels, and also the pool pH, alkalinity and calcium hardness levels.

Saltwater pools can be tested for salt with a salt test strip. if you use a salt chlorine generator, you’ll still want to test for chlorine, and you may also want to test for salt level, even if just to check it against what your controller displays.

Phosphates can be tested for with a pool phosphate test kit. Phosphates are a food for algae and can enter a pool from a variety of sources. For pools with recurring algae problems, removal of phosphates can often be a miracle cure.

Metals in the water, which can stain the surface can be tested for, with kits and strips to test copper or iron content in the water.

The level of chloramines or combined chlorine can be determined with a DPD test kit, or you can use the ShockChek test strips to tell you when shocking is needed for chloramine removal.

TDS, or total dissolved solids can be tested for with a SafeDip test meter, one that can also test for ORP, or oxidation reduction potential.

 

There are 5 types of Chlorine; Sodium hypochlorite, Lithium hypochlorite, Calcium hypochlorite, Dichlor, and Trichlor. The first difference is Sodium, Lithium, and Calcium are un-stabilized Chlorine. Dichlor and Trichlor are stabilized.

 

Pool Water balancing is not such a complicated exercise. ... A pool that is "balanced" has proper levels of pH, Total Alkalinity, and Calcium Hardness. These are: pH: 7.2-7.8, Total Alkalinity: 80-120 ppm, Calcium Hardness, 180-220 ppm and Cyanuric Acid (Stabilizer): 30-50 ppm.

 

Calcium hardness must be actively managed—along with pH and total alkalinity—to keep water in proper chemical balance. Current industry standards call for maintainingcalcium hardness in the ideal range of 200–400 ppm in pools and 150–250 ppm in spas.

 

Most pool experts recommend a pool pH between 7.2 and 7.8. To raise or lower pH, a pool custodian simply adds acids or alkalis into the water. For example, adding sodium carbonate (soda ash) or sodium bicarbonate (baking soda) will generally raise the pH, and adding muriatic acid or sodium bisulfate will lower the pH.

 

Here’s pics of what happens when you put the wrong chlorine in the different feeders. 

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