ARTICLE 680—SWIMMING POOLS, SPAS, HOT TUBS, FOUNTAINS, AND SIMILAR INSTALLATIONS

 
 

The benefits of using a UV-C purifier in a swimming pool. The protection of bathers against illnesses caused by microorganisms that are unaffected by chlorine. The virtual elimination of the eye, nose, skin and respiratory system irritation caused by chloramines in the water.

 
 

How to Clean an Accu-Tab® Feeder

Maintenance and routine cleaning is important for your Accu-Tab® Feeder. Proper cleaning can reduce damage from unwanted particles introduced to your chlorination system.

 

Aquatic Facility Operator (AFO) Certification

The AFO program provides the most comprehensive and up-to date training for pool operators and includes information on water chemistry, disinfection, mechanical systems, operations, healthy pools and safety.

 

NO METERING. NO MIXING. NO CONTEST.

Lightens the load on pool operators from safety, handling and maintenance, to creating a more pleasant workplace environment. See for yourself.

 
 

Signs that your controller sensors need to be cleaned

Slow sensor response

Increased need to calibrate sensors

Inconsistent readings

 

There are 5 types of Chlorine; Sodium hypochlorite, Lithium hypochlorite, Calcium hypochlorite, Dichlor, and Trichlor. The first difference is Sodium, Lithium, and Calcium are un-stabilized Chlorine. Dichlor and Trichlor are stabilized.

 

Pool Water balancing is not such a complicated exercise. ... A pool that is "balanced" has proper levels of pH, Total Alkalinity, and Calcium Hardness. These are: pH: 7.2-7.8, Total Alkalinity: 80-120 ppm, Calcium Hardness, 180-220 ppm and Cyanuric Acid (Stabilizer): 30-50 ppm.

 

Calcium hardness must be actively managed—along with pH and total alkalinity—to keep water in proper chemical balance. Current industry standards call for maintainingcalcium hardness in the ideal range of 200–400 ppm in pools and 150–250 ppm in spas.

 

Most pool experts recommend a pool pH between 7.2 and 7.8. To raise or lower pH, a pool custodian simply adds acids or alkalis into the water. For example, adding sodium carbonate (soda ash) or sodium bicarbonate (baking soda) will generally raise the pH, and adding muriatic acid or sodium bisulfate will lower the pH.